In the Shadow of Grenfell

World Cup 2018

Behind the scene in the Vatican

Palio di Siena

Eyewitness: The Guardian's centre page

A story in Lampedusa

Migrants: South of Italy

Migrants: Calais

Hello Cazenove

In the Shadow of Grenfell

Client: The Guardian

After Grenfell it was important to understand what life is for people that live in the area and the people that live in the tower opposite Grenfell.
Everybody in that communities has been touched deeply from what happened on the 14th of June 2017, when over 70 people lost their life.

The Silchester Estate was built in the late 60s in Notting Dale, an area renowned for its piggeries in the 19th century, its slums in the 30s and its race riots in the 50s. The estate’s four towers were part of a utopian vision, creating new communities in the sky, surrounded by open land. Ashby is more proud of the open land than anything else: while the nearby Westway is clogged with traffic pumping out pollution, this garden, which is open to the general public, allows the area to breathe.

After the fire, it was reported that Kensington and Chelsea had reserves of £274m, making it one of the richest councils in the country. It was also revealed that the fire-resistant zinc cladding approved by Grenfell residents had been replaced in the refurbishment contract with combustible aluminium panels, to save £293,368 on the tower’s £10m regeneration bill.

The result of an incredible 4 months collaborations with the community living in the shadow of Grenfell. Read the full article of Simon Hattenstone watch the great videos of Alex Healey in the link below

Whitstable House.
View from outside the barrels that surround Grenfell Tower

The view over Grenfell Tower from the 20th, last floor, of Whitstable House

Lina lives on the 20th and top floor of Whitstable Tower

“We never really noticed the tower before,” Lina says, “but now you can’t not look at it. I kept waking up that night, but it was only at 6.30am that I went into the kitchen. My window was open and I heard a helicopter, looked out and screamed.”

The back of Whitstable House

Joe in his flat inside Whitstable House

The entrance of Whitstable House

Rama is one of the resident of Whitstable.
German born, son of Polish refugees.

Nahid Ashby is a long term tenant at Silchester Estate
Photographed in the her flat in Frinstead house on the 16th floor

Under the A40 flyover

Inside the Maxilla Club run by Joe and his parents Albert and Margaret Walsh

Inside Rama's kitchen in Whitstable.
His wife put the curtain up to avoid constantly looking at Grenfell.

Whitstable House and the A40, Westway, at dusk as seen from a balcony of Dixon House

World Cup 2018

the joy and despair in British living rooms

I spent the first 2 weeks of the World Cup travelling around England watching 13 games with as many different nationalities, capturing the joy and despair in British living rooms.
Definitely one of the nicest and joyful (intense at time) job ever done.
I’ve eaten a lot of crisps and beer, but also the traditional Brazilian dish of feijoada in north London, Mexican quesadillas and guacamole in Putney, Colombian arepas in Manchester and a lovely Moroccan tagine cooked on the barbecue in Letchworth.
I was sat with a fixed camera near the television screen and never asked anyone to pose. As soon as the match got under way, they forgot I was there.
Very few people left the room or changed positions throughout the game. They were glued to their chairs

England 6 Panama 1

Serbia 1 Costa Rica 0

Mexico 1 Germany 0

Mexico 1 Germany 0

Morocco 0 Iran 1

Brazil 1 Switzerland 1

Japan 2 Colombia 1

Japan 2 Colombia 1

Iran 0 Spain 1 (Iranian goal which moment after got disallowed)

Iran 0 Spain 1

France 1 Peru 0

Iceland 0 Nigeria 2

South Korea 1 Mexico 2

Senegal 2 Japan 2

Russia 3 Egypt 1

Colombia 3 Poland 0

Behind the scene in the Vatican

Vatican City is a highly secretive world in miniature containing in less than half a square kilometre everything a state needs.
In this historical moment, where the Pope himself has spoken about a third world war, religion plays a fundamental role. The Roman church has kept its political power well established through the centuries. Catholicism has always been at the centre of Italian society, but what is decided in the Vatican does influence the life of billion people around the globe.

The sense of history, the magnificent spaces and the silence are elements that wrap your senses when you walk around the Vatican. Tradition, hierarchy, spirituality and big events have always been at the heart of the Church.

Thanks to an extraordinary Jubilee, which normally happen every 25 years, and after many months of letters and meetings, I have been given an unprecedented opportunity: I have spent 2 months documenting some of the behind the scene and mainly the people in the Vatican.

From the nuns that work in the Sacristy ironing the Pope’s and clergies’ garments to the gardeners, from the Sampietrini in charge of the maintenance of St Peter to the Pope’s driver and the Swiss Guards, my work is an homage to the people at the base of the Vatican’s hierarchy showing situations rarely seen by the public.

A Swiss Guard keeps watch on the Scala Regia that connect the Apostolic Palace and St Peter's basilica

The key holder are in charge of opening some of the hundreds doors in the Vatican

A Sampietrino polishing the floor of St Peter

Swiss Guard Kremer getting ready for the swearing-in ceremony

Renzo Cestier, the most senior of the 3 official Pope's driver filling the tank of the Popemobile

A nun walking inside St Peter's

Swiss Guards marching just outside the basilica of St Peter heading back to their headquarter.

Inside St Peter's

Suor Rita, Marta, Elvira and Adelaide inside the Sacristy of St Peter ironing the garments for the clergy and for the Pope

St Peter's altar

Inside the Sacristy of San Giovanni in Laterano. Moments after the end of the ceremonies the clergy returns the garments wore

Early morning. Moments before another solemn ceremony a cardinal rests in front of the Holy Door

Early morning inside St Peter's in front of the grave of Pope John Paul II and senior clergymen are dressed and waiting for the beginning of another grand ceremony

Inside the Apostolic Palace, moments before the diplomats will walk the corridor to meet the Pope for the official greeting of the new year

The Pope and his closest team walking in the Prima Loggia inside the Apostolic Palace to go to meet the Diplomatic Corps for the traditional exchange of new year greetings

Palio di Siena

The culmination of the Palio di Siena is a 90-second horse race. But for Sienese, it is so much more than that: it is an embodiment of civic pride that has been held since 1656

The Palio di Siena horse race has been held twice a year, in July and August. Ten horses and riders representing ten of the city wards compete in a 3 laps race around the Piazzo del Campo. ThePalio is a way of life that dominates throughout the year.
There are seventeen contrade, or wards, in Siena. Each contrada is a city within a city that provides a social structure, a support network and civic identity. The Palio is the culmination of the rivalry between the contrade.

Each Contrada is like a Republic, with a Parliament, and assembly. There is a Priore, which the head of the Contrada, the Captain which is the Ministry of War and in charge of the Palio and many other roles.
Quote "The Palio in fact is like a War". The Palio is not a re-enact, is not made for tourists. It's real and it can get brutal.

The Tratta is the day that open the Palio. 4 days before the actual race.
40 horses run around the Campo. Only 10 get picked by the different Captains.
Through a lottery, the 10 selected horses get given to each Contrada. Some horses are better than others and the Campo knows it. The "Barbaresco" is in charge to pick the horse and bring it back to the Contrada. Only in that moment the Captain and i Mangini (his deputies) start contacting the jockeys.
Once the jockey has agreed, he arrives in the Contrada and kept in a secured place for 4 days and escorted 24h a day.

From the evening of the Tratta the test run begin. There are 2 test run a day till the day of the Palio, in total 6 test run.

In these 3 evenings each Contrada, even the ones that don't run, hold the 'cenini' (small dinners). The night before the Palio is the main dinner with the jockey too.

The atmosphere and the tension in the city grow every day, till the day of the race.
Everything ends in 90 seconds but a victory last for ever and get celebrated throughout the following year.

Contrada Lupa

The Contradiaioli follows the horse as they parade and gather from the different part of Siena into the Pizza del Campo, (the square where they run the Palio)

Contrada Pantera

Kids from Pantera looking at their horse

The horse of the Giraffa going back to the stable

The stable of the Contrada Pantera

Members of the Contrada Pantera wearing the official uniforms in the colours of the Contrada for the Historical Parade before the Palio

The horse that will run the Palio di Siena for the Pantera is blessed inside the Chiesa (church) of the Contrada Pantera.

kids in the Contrada Giraffa

Stable of the Contrada Giraffa

The Passeggiata Storica (historical parade)
just before the actual start of the race in the piazza del Campo

The horse of the Tartuca

La Mossa is the name of the starting line

The horse of Contrada Aquila

Tension is building up moment before the beginning of the race

Final lap, the Lupa passes the Drago and finish first

Jonatan Bartoletti aka Scompiglio celebrating the victory of the Palio and his place on history having won his second Palio on a row

Eyewitness: The Guardian's centre page

Client: The Guardian

Modern newspapers face aggressive competition for the reader's attention. Television and the internet have proved more effective at delivering breaking news fast, and a contemporary newspaper redesign must focus on the things which print can do better than other media.

The "eyewitness" centre spread is the most dramatic expression of this philosophy devoting the 60cm x 40cm centre spread to a single news image.
The image sits within a typographic frame, which brands it as part of the news run. The labelling is an enlarged version of the system used on other pages, but the colours - muted blue and greys – were selected so as not to compete with the images, and to stand apart from the warmer palette on the news pages, to suggest a distinction between text-led and visual content.

In an age of fast-moving but low-resolution images the still photograph has enormous power. Eyewitness has shown that even time-pressed newspaper readers value the opportunity to engage at their own pace with a photograph which can offer a depth of detail and meaning.

Santa Maria in Paganica church, L'Aquila, Italy
An earthquake hit the region one year earlier

Calabria, Italy

Marble quarries
Carrara, Italy

Mondello's beach
Palermo, Italy

Olive harvesting,
Italy

Naples, Italy

The Colosseum, Rome

Lisbon, Portugal

Shakespeare's Globe Theatre
London, England

Oktoberfest
Munich, Germany

The Blue Mosque at dawn, Istanbul, turkey

Funfair
Munich, Germany

A summer day inside the As Roma football club,
Rome, Italy

A celebration to the Routemaster buses,
Trafalgare Square, London, England

A story in Lampedusa

Thousands of migrants continue to arrive in Italy, crossing the Mediterranean Sea by boat and risking their lives to reach Europe.

In the last three years more than 50000 people have arrived on board more than 700 boats. Around 60% come from Maghreb,18% from East Africa, 15% from West Africa and the rest from Subcontinental Indian and Middle East.

Once they've landed, migrants are identified by the police and kept inside the Cpa (first aid centre) for few days, then redirected to other centres where they can stay longer and have their future decided. Some of them are granted asylum and others are sent back home. Approximately 20% of the 20.000 people who arrived in Lampedusa were deemed to be in need of international protection.

Between 2006 and 2008 there were several "tragic landings" reported, with an unknown number of deaths.

Since 2002 MSF has established a project at landings for one of the main entry doors to Europe, the island of Lampedusa. Although migration has become a structural phenomenon in Italy, reception conditions for these people have not markedly improved and the living conditions for undocumented migrants are usually extremely difficult. Even though high numbers of boat arrivals are foreseen, access to care for illegal migrants still remains a mirage in various parts of the country.

Lampedusa CPSA, holding centre (first aid centre).

Every person landed is supply with a number and the date of the arrived

Queueing for breakfast

The men dormitory

Patrolling the sea with the Italian Coast Guard

A migrant just rescued by the Coast Guard

Before going to the dump, the bigger boat has to be destroyed at the port.
This boat has landed on the 17th bringing 376 migrants to Italy

Lampedusa CPSA, holding centre (first aid centre).

the men are kept in a diferent area form the women and under-age

After maximum 3 days they should leave to other destination.
Ready to depart to other CPT in Italy

Lampedusa Graveyard where bodies found at sea of undocumented migrants get buried

Migrants: South of Italy

The dark side of the orange harvest.

Rosarno in Calabria. The town, in middle of the toe of Italy, is an agricultural community of 15,000 people. It is one of the places where undocumented workers queue each morning for jobs on the Italian orange and olive groves, and in the juice and candied peel factories that supply northern Europe. About 5,000 of them live in the Rosarno area alone.

Recently the international charity Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) became so concerned about the plight of migrants in Calabria that it sent a team to assess the situation. It found that most migrants were living in conditions that do not even meet the minimum standards set by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees for refugee camps in Africa. The organisation now runs free clinics in Calabria for undocumented migrants.

Migrant workers can only work on average three days a week. They can earn 25 euro a day, but some farmers have recently tried to cut pay to 11 euros a day as they find the price for oranges and clementines has fallen below their cost of production.

Many farmers have stopped harvesting their fruit because the world price is too low to cover their costs of labour, even using cheap migrants. They are facing competition from Morocco and Spain.

Rosarno.
The queue at damn on the main road of the town hoping to get some daily work

One of the squatted ex factory where migrants live
Samia is from Ghana and due to an accident he cant work

Inside one of the squatted ex factory where migrants live

Rosarno.
Squatted factory

A juice factory

The MSF clinic in Rosarno

Rosarno.
Another squatted factory

Migrants from Ivory cost arrived just a week ago squatting a derelict building in the orange grove

Inside the squatted factory at night

Migrants: Calais

On the last days before it would have been evacuated, I went Inside the squatted centre where migrants have been previous living and sheltered in Calais.

Around 1,000 migrants are building a shantytown known as the ‘new jungle’ on the wasteland around the Jules Ferry day centre.

The Jules Ferry centre, is the first centre opened by the French government and for a few hours each afternoon, allows one hot meal, access to showers, toilets, electricity points to recharge phones and advice on migration and asylum issues.

The new day centre will provide overnight accommodation for 50 women and children but there is no overnight provision for men

Outside the small centre the condition are inhuman as no shelter or running water is provided.

Building shelters in what is called the 'jungle’

Hello Cazenove

These pictures has been taken in London, in Hackney, specifically around and in Cazenove Rd.

The images are part of a bigger project and an exhibition developed in collaboration with the Hackney Museum about the road, the community and its surroundings.

Cazenove rd sum up the multiculturalism of the city, where within one road there is a Mosque, a Synagogue, a queer bar, plus the typical charity shop, the second hand shop, the art gallery, the organic shop etc etc...

Lag BaOmer is a traditional Jewish holiday. By somebody is interpreted as the anniversary of death

Rabbi Gluck, one of the spiritual local leader, photographed in his house

the beginning of Cazenove road

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